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Lewis acid zeolites – (green) catalysts for tomorrow

Jan Přech, Ewelina Szaniawská and Jiří Čejka (group of Synthesis, Catalysis and Advanced Materials from the Dept. of Physical and Macromolecular Chemistry) with Steven L. Suib (University of Connecticut, USA) published a paper in the most cited chemistry journal: Catalysis Reviews (IF=72,1). The article critically reviews recent advances in tetra- and pentavalent metal-substituted molecular sieve catalysis.

Published Jan 20, 2023

New calls for postdoc applicants open

We are looking for prospective international, non czech citizens, post-docs for research within a specific field of biology, chemistry and geography. Deadline for applications is July 20th, 2022.

Published Jun 17, 2022

How to convert teaching from in-class to online environment

Are you struggling with teaching via Zoom or other online platforms? Are you exhausted after every class taught online? Are your students less engaged online than in-class? Are you unable to cover all the planned material while teaching online? This two-session interactive course is tailored-made for lecturers who are in the process of converting their in-class courses to the online environment. It provides basic tips about what to do and will help you feel more confident about teaching online.

Published Nov 03, 2020

Professor Petr Nachtigall died

Prof. RNDr. Petr Nachtigall, Ph.D. passed away on 28 December 2022. He was an internationally recognized expert in computational material science; he worked at our faculty at the Department of Physical and Macromolecular Chemistry. We honor his memory.

Published Jan 04, 2023

Heme, heme, is oxygen here?

You have probably heard that aristocrats have blue blood, right? Of course, it is not true. We all have blood of a beautiful red color, thanks to a protein called hemoglobin – the blood pigment. This protein has a non-protein part called heme, which carries oxygen in our blood from lungs to a whole body. Besides being an oxygen carrier, heme has a much wider set of tasks in various proteins of many organisms. For example, bacteria use heme in oxygen sensor proteins to orient themselves in the environment. The team of Assoc. Prof. Markéta Martínková from the Faculty of Science, Charles University has recently published a new mini-review focused on the mechanisms of action of those proteins.

Published Dec 18, 2022

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